Early Clues

1957
HEY, next week is my older sister’s birthday. She’s the one who, 50 years ago, suggested I write a letter to my grandmother who had just that day left us to go live in NYC with her sister.

I had been crying for hours. Everyone else in the house had gone to another room to get away from it, but my sister poked her head around the corner.

“Why don’t you write her a letter?”

I poured my heart out in 3 short sentences. I don’t know what I wrote, but when I was done, I wasn’t crying anymore. I count this as my first writing lesson.

Q: If you write, what was your earliest clue that you may be a writer? Leave a comment (below) or send me an email, whichever you like.

About Marilyn

Reading, thinking, listening, writing and talking about faith, creativity, ESL for refugees, grief and finding the story in a story. Student of Spanish. Foe of procrastination. Cheez-it fan. People person with hermit tendencies or vice-versa. Thank you so much for reading.
This entry was posted in creativity, discoveries, finding your voice, letting go, relationship, writing. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Early Clues

  1. bethhavey says:

    I wrote a short piece in 4th grade about an avalanche. It was bad, in retrospect, but I was hooked. I still have it. Beth

    Like

  2. Fern Boldt says:

    I wrote a poem for our high school newspaper.

    Like

  3. Belinda says:

    I still have a book filled with poems and stories that I wrote when I was aged 11-12, and illustrated by me, too! It is covered in old torn brown paper. I’m not saying I was a good writer–but I was a writer. 🙂

    Like

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