Meeting Mother Teresa

Third in a series about acts of charity.

I heard a story on the radio last Monday about a young woman who worked as an editor of plays in New York City. She was obsessed with Mother Teresa and longed to do work that was as important and meaningful as Mother Teresa’s work in Calcutta.

She learned that Mother Teresa was coming to New York and found a way position herself so as to meet the famous nun.

“Oh, Mother Teresa,” she said. “I’m so glad to meet you. The work you do is so wonderful….so important…”

Mother Teresa shook her head and said “no no, it’s not the work that is important – it’s the love for the people….”.

The young woman nodded.

“What do you do?” Mother Teresa asked.

And the young woman said, “Well, what I do isn’t important. I work in a theater. I help put on plays.”

Mother Teresa said “There are so many different kinds of hunger in this world. In my country there is a famine of the body. In this country, there is a famine of the spirit. Stay here and feed your people.

The story was told by Peter Sagal on THE MOTH’s Chicago Grandslam podcast. You can read more details about the story at this blog.

image: New York Post file photo

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About Marilyn

Reading, thinking, listening, writing and talking about faith, creativity, ESL for refugees, grief and finding the story in a story. Student of Spanish. Foe of procrastination. Cheez-it fan. People person with hermit tendencies or vice-versa. Thank you so much for reading.
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